Wright & Teague

Gary Wright & Sheila Teague

“You could put a piece of Wright & Teague yellow gold in the British Museum and it would be amongst friends.” James Sherwood

Wright & Teague philosophy

We met as students together at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. We found out we shared many things, the same birthday, and a fascination for jewellery’s deep-rooted spiritual connections to ritual and heritage. Our aim for our art is to forge new links.

You can discover these connections across time and culture, modern and ancient, tribal and cosmopolitan. To find that jewellery doesn’t just adorn the body, it intrigues the mind. And, in being given, worn and adored, acquires meaning as well as patination.

So many meanings come from the use of symbols. In the earliest civilisations, a simple ring, fashioned in gold, became more than a sign of status, as an emblem of endlessness, time in circles. Onto our rings and charms we inscribe poetic inscriptions and quotations, in calligraphy we design, at times in our own handwriting. Iconic motifs and gemstones are used not just for their intrinsic beauty but also to express emotions and capture memories.

We love the process of research and take countless inspiration from classical mythology. The Iliad cuff is a modern piece of armour in beaten gold or silver, waiting for its odyssey. Mneme drop earrings, rippling discs of shining metal, are named for the Greek muse of memory. A favourite necklace combines form, language and culture; a Byzantine cross, an oval inscribed with “Vita”, Latin for “life”, and a charm which reads “Love Divine.”

We don’t set out to make museum pieces, though we are flattered to be represented in collections like the V&A’s. We strive for a distinctive style and energy in all our work which connects the artistic integrity of each piece with the wearer’s own story, the moments and memories most precious to you.

We love glamour with gravitas. An emotional weight which complements the heaviness of even the tiniest jewel. The sense of a deeper story, if you care to look for it, beneath the surface.

Gary Wright and Sheila Teague, 2015